Wednesday 1st December Art Walk Schedule

5.30 – Project Space Leeds: Latitude/ Tropic and Shooting Young Offenders
6.15 – Leeds Art Gallery: Northern Art Prize
6.45 – Henry Moore Institute: Angkor Wat

Meet at Project Space Leeds at 5.30 pm. For a map see
http://www.projectspaceleeds.org.uk/finding_us_unid39c0_page.aspx

Following the art walk we were planning to have a Christmas drink at the Victoria Hotel. However we have now also been invited to a drinks reception at City Inn – which has a changing programme of art exhibitions within the hotel. We will see what the preferred option is on the night!

For more information contact Gill at Pavilion
T > 0113 242 5100
E > gill@pavilion.org.uk

Booking is not essential but it does help us estimate numbers.

More about the exhibitions:

PSL [Project Space Leeds]

Roger Palmer Latitude/ Jeremy Wafer Tropic: An exhibition of works which map or trace geographical locations along the Tropic of Capricorn, questioning what the photographic image can tell us about variations in topography and different indigenous and colonial histories.

Shooting Young Offenders by Kirsteen Ashton: Kirsteen Ashton is a social documentary photographer who is fascinated by people and aims to capture sensitive images of individuals whose stories need telling. She spent five weeks with a group of thirteen 14-18 year old young offenders attending a Summer Arts College in Batley.

Leeds Art Gallery

The Northern Art Prize: This year’s nominated artists are Alec Finlay, Lubaina Himid, David Jacques and Haroon Mirza.  The exhibition shows examples of the artists’ recent work, with the winner being announced in January.

Henry Moore Institute

Angkor Wat, From Temple to Text: Angkor Wat is Cambodia’s most famous ancient temple, built in the twelfth century at the height of the Angkorian Empire. Curated by Ashley Thompson, an academic based at Leeds University, Angkor Wat: From Temple to Text features paper ‘casts’ of extraordinary inscriptions carved into the stones of the building. Many of the inscriptions were carved in the 16th century, and the casts were made in the 19th century at the initiative of French colonial authorities.

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